Understanding Shea Butter & Your Skin

Most of you already know that properly hydrating the skin is one of the most important components in a healthy skincare routine.  So, let’s talk about shea butter --  one of the most tried and true natural moisturizers.  Shea butter has been used since the age of the ancient Egyptians; Cleopatra is even said to have been a big fan, and legions of modern women continue to rely on its moisturizing properties today.

What exactly makes shea butter so nourishing?  It’s the richness of vitamins and fatty acids, which give it the ability to protect and hydrate the skin:

  • Vitamin A:  The most prominent vitamin present in shea butter.  It is often referred to as the anti-aging vitamin because it strengthens and stimulates the dermis, helping boost collagen and fibroblast production. Vitamin A also increases blood flow to the skin’s surface, lessening the normal breakdown of collagen and elastin which occurs with age and exposure to the elements.
  • Vitamin E:  A very powerful antioxidant found in shea butter, which helps combat free radicals.  Free radicals are unstable molecules which cause cell damage, thus speeding up the aging process.  Additionally, Vitamin E helps to strengthen the skin’s moisture barrier, which helps protect the skin from everyday elements.
  • Linoleic Acid:  Shea butter is also rich in fatty acids such as Linoleic Acid.  This fatty acid is naturally hydrating, thoroughly working its way deep past the skin's surface barrier.  Additionally, Linoleic Acid is an essential supplement because the body does not naturally produce it. A deficiency of Linoleic Acid can lead to dry skin and decreased cell regeneration, therefore, adding shea butter into your skincare regimen can help minimize this deficiency and keep your skin bright.
  • Oleic Acid:  This fatty acid is what gives shea butter its thick, creamy texture and is one of the primary reasons that shea butter is so moisturizing.  Oleic Acid works with the skin’s natural barrier to lock in moisture and keep skin from becoming dry and dull.  This deep hydration can help keep skin cells from becoming damaged, and can help your skin retain a more supple, youthful glow. 

These are just a few of the many nutrients that have made shea butter an invaluable skincare ingredient for thousands of years.  Shea butter can be used on its own or in conjunction with other natural restorative oils.  At OZNaturals, we harness the myriad benefits found in shea butter in our luxurious body moisturizers.  Our much-loved Body Butter enhances shea butter with macadamia nut oil and sweet almond oil.  Our deliciously silky Body Soufflé not only contains shea butter, but also naturally restorative olive and jojoba oil. These body moisturizers, along with the entire line of OZNaturals skincare products, is now formulated using a unique cold-processing manufacturing system, and we invite you to give them a try.

Whether you are using shea butter on its own or as an ingredient in one of OZNaturals cold-processed natural skincare products, your skin will benefit from its deeply hydrating qualities.  Join me (and Cleopatra!) and add shea butter to your skincare regimen.  You can learn more about shea butter on our blog, The Natural Life.

Learn more by taking our skincare quiz: https://www.oznaturals.com/pages/skin-care-quiz

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